Are my panic attacks related to being diagnosed with OCD’s

This topic contains 4 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by Michael Valentine Michael Valentine 1 month ago.

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    Karl
    Participant
    I tend to dwell on things more than the usual person! is that why when fear arises with me I I have a hard time controlling my panic attacks?
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    Hello –

    Our anxiety can use many tactics to try to get us to respond to a specific threat of danger. When you state “dwell on things” this sounds to me like its more like obsessing. Obsessing is a tactic that we use to try to control the future. Regardless of how our anxiety manifests, all anxiety has to components; one is that our anxiety is based on a futuristic “what if” thought, and the other is that it in some way is trying to “control” a situation to help us avoid the situation that we are anxious over.

    A panic attack is our anxiety trying to get us to respond to an irrational threat of danger.

    Learning to manage your thoughts – using the mental & physical tools – and approaching your anxiety in a productive way will help you to create recovery.

    Let me know if you have any additional questions or concerns – I am happy to help.

    Wishing you the best! Thank you!

    Michael Valentine

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    Karl
    Participant
    Thank you for the helpful information and I will be exploring more of your program to see if I can get some relief .
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    Misfit
    Participant
    I think I have the same thing. Once I get started thinking about something it wont stop. Sometimes I have panic attacks too. It really sucks!
    Obsessive thinking is something that is present in all anxiety disorders. It is our minds way of trying to control the future. Once the fear gets to building it can escalate to a panic attack.

    But keep in mind that all obsessing thinking and panic attacks are both a conditioning. When we learn to manage our thoughts – and learn to “look away” from our fear – then our anxiety will naturally become less.

    Continue to watch the videos – and work the tools. Remember, the tools are the single most effective thing that we can do to break the cycle of obsessive thinking – and ultimately teach ourselves to “look away” from our fear. So practicing of the tools – even just 5 minutes a day – will help the recovery process tremendously.

    Keep in touch and let me know how you are doing.

    Michael

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